Free Fonts?!?!

myfonts.com has a newsletter–and they send out free fonts on Friday!! Sometimes it's a range of weights and sometimes just one–but it's worth your money ;) 

 

Here are some examples:

  Lulo Clean  family, a layered type system from our friends at  Yellow Design Studio . A more clean-cut version of the original  Lulo  design, Lulo Clean is a shoe-in choice for projects where you need your selected typeface to exude personality. Its layered capabilities are bold, engaging, and fun.

Lulo Clean family, a layered type system from our friends at Yellow Design Studio. A more clean-cut version of the original Lulo design, Lulo Clean is a shoe-in choice for projects where you need your selected typeface to exude personality. Its layered capabilities are bold, engaging, and fun.

  Wreath  from  Insigne  is a collection of 21 script fonts that includes five different texture variations to choose from, as well as companion decorative ornaments.

Wreath from Insigne is a collection of 21 script fonts that includes five different texture variations to choose from, as well as companion decorative ornaments.

   Newslab  family from  Latinotype .  Comprised of 16 friendly yet solidly-constructed slab serif fonts, this workhorse design is an apt choice for editorial, packaging, branding projects and more.

 Newslab family from Latinotype.

Comprised of 16 friendly yet solidly-constructed slab serif fonts, this workhorse design is an apt choice for editorial, packaging, branding projects and more.

Source: https://www.myfonts.com/newsletters/

Never Ever Just Design Pretty Little Apps

Guard against that vanity which courts a compliment, or is fed by it.”
 –Chalmers

neverdoprettylittleapps

"Surfing some design-inspiration sites with my hype-busting, critical “U-X-ray eyes” :) I often come away with smoke rising out of my ears. Like the title says this is a rant, but don’t take it too seriously. I’m trying to make a point.

Yes, I know that some of these design showcasing sites are not meant to be necessarily for real-world products, but then I still say they need to reflect a thoughtful approach to design, primarily by asking the main question “Who is this for?”, “How will people use my product” and “Is it actually usable?”.

Superficial app designs that follow the latest fads and blatantly ignore basic usability conventions, UX best practices, and fundamental principles of interaction design would most likely fail in the real world! Luckily, they usually don’t go beyond the generally ridiculous, self-parading fantasyland on Dribbble and Behance.

Unfortunately, these “concept designs,” a single screen in an imaginary app, only serve to perpetuate designers being labeled as “artists” — as pretenders who only care about the veneer, pretty colors, and typefaces. Nowadays, any app design has to go way beyond that.

I’m talking about UX."

Read the rest of the article and add some UX to ya day by clicking this sentence!

Source: https://uxdesign.cc/never-ever-just-design...

Dieter Rams: Is my design good design?

Back in the late 1970s, Dieter Rams was becoming increasingly concerned by the state of the world around him: “An impenetrable confusion of forms, colours and noises.”

Aware that he was a significant contributor to that world, he asked himself an important question: is my design good design?

His answer is expressed in his ten principles for good design.

Read More

Magazine as Sound-based Voyeurism

Party Next Door challenges what defines a “magazine” and reaffirms what “party” means

Interesting documentation of the album using packaging and a gradient background

Refreshingly, in the wake of the tiresome “Print is dead! No it isn’t” chatter that’s been waffling on for a while now, the notion of what a “magazine” is, and could be, has been broadened into wild, exciting new possibilities. Content is expanding beyond the tried-and-tested art/lifestyle/fashion worlds—as in this magazine celebrating work by immigrant artists, and highlighting the complexities of the O-1 Visa application. The idea of ink on paper has long been challenged with the proliferation of online publications, and with the likes of Pop Up Magazine, a publication that exists only as a live iteration, for just one day.

Read more.

Source: https://eyeondesign.aiga.org/when-a-magazi...

Wooden Cat Stacking Game is Like Playing Jenga, But With a Pile of Kitties

Cats are often viewed as loners who relish their alone time, so you’d hardly expect them to be in cahoots with other felines. But when you pick up a set of the wooden Cat Pile game, you’ll see that it turns the notion on its head—or back, or tail. Created by the Taiwan brand Comma, the felines—posed in a variety of ways—are meant to be stacked in seemingly endless combinations, with the ultimate goal that they form a pyramid-like shape.

Cat Pile is often associated with the classic game Jenga, although Comma’s creation is played in reverse. Jenga is started with the tower fully assembled and challenges you to disassemble (and reassemble) it brick-by-brick without toppling over. Cat Pile, in contrast, instructs you to start at the base and juggle the wooden teak pieces atop one another. No matter how precarious they may seem, the last person to successfully stack a kitty without it falling will be crowned the winner. When you’re done with the game, the cats double as modern home decor and make a fun accessory for your desk.

One set of Cat Pile includes six kittens that measure approximately two inches tall by three inches wide by a half-inch thick. Each set has its own colorful sticker on the packaging. There are two colors—pink and blue—now available in My Modern Met Store. We also have a verision of Cat Pile which has smaller pieces for sale as well.

Read More.

Source: https://mymodernmet.com/comma-cat-stacking...